Tag Archives: Norwich North

Norwich North, the land that time forgot?

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Whilst walking home from the city a few months ago I saw the above sticker posted in the subway by Anglia Square.  At the time it made me laugh as I have always heard comments from people regarding the north of the city and how it is fares unfavourably to the south.  Furthermore, escaping the north of the city has always been a long running joke between me and my friends.

After initially forgetting the sticker, my interest was sparked again whilst looking through the ONS Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings for a recent work assignment.  Out of interest, I scrolled down to view the statistics for the Norwich North and South constituencies.  The results indeed showed a marked difference between the wages in the north and the south of the city (see Table 1 below).

Table 1. Earnings in Norwich North and South Constituencies, 2013

Norwich North

Norwich South

Gross Hourly Pay

£12.35

£14.19

Gross Weekly Pay

£397.70

£466.80

Gross Annual Pay

£21,708.00

£24,110.00

Source: ONS Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (2013)

The table shows a clear difference in the levels of earnings between the two sections of the city, with individuals living in the south of the city expected to earn on average £2,402 (gross value) more than their northern counterparts.  Furthermore, an individual in the south of the city is on average likely to earn nearly £2 per hour more than an individual working in the Norwich North constituency.

A closer look at the unemployment figures within the city reveals a much sharper divide.  Table 2 presents data from the Norwich City Council’s Economic Barometer report.  A map of the ward boundaries can be found here.

Table 2. Ward Level Jobseeker’s Allowance Claimant Count Unemployment, March 2014

Count

% of total

Bowthorpe

255

2.8

Catton Grove

318

4.0

Crome

228

3.4

Eaton

59

1.0

Lakenham

237

3.6

Mancroft

407

5.2

Mile Cross

399

4.9

Nelson

98

1.2

Sewell

235

2.5

Thorpe Hamlet

326

3.8

Town Close

211

2.6

University

134

1.6

Wensum

314

3.5

Source: Norwich Economic Barometer (March, 2014)

The table shows that the Mancroft, Mile Cross and Catton Grove wards have the highest level of benefit claimants within the city, all displaying rates of over 4%.  In particular, Mile Cross has nearly 7 times the amount of benefit claimants (in absolute terms) than Eaton – located in the south of the city.

The lowest claimant counts can be found in the wards of Eaton, Nelson and University, all displaying counts of less than 2.0%.

Interestingly, Mancroft (the ward with the highest level of claimants) is considered to be part of the Norwich South constituency.  This is despite the fact that the area around Anglia Square and Magdalen Street, which many would consider to be in the north of the city, lies within the ward,

The graphic below transposes the values from Table 2 onto a map of the Norwich wards (click to enlarge).  From the graphic it can be seen that the areas with the highest levels of claimants are located in the north/north western region of the city, whilst those areas with the lowest are located in the south western corner.

Norwich map 2

Despite this, for many the biggest symbol of the decline of the north of the city is Anglia Square.  Described by some as an ”architectural abortion”, the area has experienced physical and economic decline for several decades.  Noticing the gradual decline the council adopted a ‘Northern City Centre Area Action Plan” in 2006, with an aim to encourage investment and growth within the area.  The belief was that the construction of new flats and offices would revamp the area and in turn attract new cafes, restaurants and shops.  However, the plan was badly hampered due to the recession and to date the only one real change, the introduction of a one way road system (St.Augustines gyratory scheme), has taken place.   In an area of relatively high unemployment (in comparison to the rest of the city), such a regeneration scheme could create a number of much needed, new jobs and opportunities.  

However, whilst the council has held out for a private investor for the scheme, other areas such as the Norwich Research Park (albeit not in the City Council’s jurisdiction) have received £26 million in state funded investment.  While no one can doubt that such an investment will bring new jobs and growth to the area, it does question the allocation of state funds by the government to a research park and area which has been prospering since the 1960s.  For now, progress on Northern City Centre Action Plan remains painstakingly slow and it remains to be seen whether the real changes required within this part of the city will ever come to pass.

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